Last edited by Nagis
Friday, July 24, 2020 | History

4 edition of Shifting cultivation in Latin America found in the catalog.

Shifting cultivation in Latin America

R. F. Watters

Shifting cultivation in Latin America

by R. F. Watters

  • 293 Want to read
  • 39 Currently reading

Published by Food and Agriculture Organization, H.M.S.O. in Rome, London .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Latin America.
    • Subjects:
    • Shifting cultivation -- Latin America.

    • Edition Notes

      Statementby R. F. Watters.
      SeriesFAO forestry development paper no. 17
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsSD121 .F6 no. 17, S473.9 .F6 no. 17
      The Physical Object
      Paginationxi, 310 p.
      Number of Pages310
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL5465062M
      ISBN 100119403412
      LC Control Number73167847
      OCLC/WorldCa2722467

      Shifting Cultivation. Shifting cultivation is a mode of farming long followed in the humid tropics of Sub-Saharan Africa, Southeast Asia, and South America. In the practice of “slash and burn”, farmers would cut the native vegetation and burn it, then plant crops in the exposed, ash-fertilized soil for two or three seasons in succession.   The International Labour Organization and the Inter-American Development Bank predict that decarbonisation, or a transition to a net-zero emission economy, would create million jobs in Latin.

      Shifting preferences towards packaged, branded dairy is propelling expansion in emerging markets, while mature urban areas are more impacted by product trends. The Americas: A growing opportunity Consumption of dairy is also distinct and variable in the Americas. Latin America, for example, is one of the fastest-growing dairy markets in the world. The current contribution of agriculture to deforestation varies by region, with industrial agriculture being responsible for 30% of deforestation in Africa and Asia, but close to 70% in Latin America. The most significant agricultural drivers of deforestation include soy, palm oil, and cattle ranching.

      dominance of the British hindered the development of Latin American industries and reinforced the economic dependence of Latin America in the world trade network. From to , the post independence economy of Latin America remained stagnant. After , in response to European demand for Latin American products, the economy quickened. From to , the estimated total for poppy cultivation fell from 1, hectares to Like the country’s sizeable reduction in coca cultivation, this is due at least in part to heightened security crackdowns and an increase in eradication programs. But poppy production in Latin America is not limited to these two countries alone.


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Shifting cultivation in Latin America by R. F. Watters Download PDF EPUB FB2

Shifting cultivation in Latin America. [R F Watters] Home. WorldCat Home About WorldCat Help. Search. Search for Library Items Search for Lists Search for Contacts Book: All Authors / Contributors: R F Watters.

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This study reviews the various forms of shifting agriculture practised in Latin America, with particular emphasis on Venezuela, Mexico and Peru. It illustrates the pressures on the land-hungry peasant which force him to clear a plot in the forest, cultivate it until yields decline on the exhausted soil and then move on to repeat the process by: Book: The nature of shifting cultivation in Latin America.

pp pp. ref Abstract: In comparison with most temperate regions regions Subject Category: Miscellaneous see more details, the tropics tropics Subject Category: Climate RelatedCited by: 2. This publication is part of the Latin America after the commodity boom series. Authors: Andy Duff and Andres Padilla The Latin American region is an important net exporter of food and agricultural commodities, accounting for 16% of total global food and agriculture exports and 4% of total food and agriculture imports.

Latin words for cultivation include cultura and cultus. Find more Latin words at. Shifting agriculture, system of cultivation that preserves soil fertility by plot (field) rotation, as distinct from crop shifting agriculture a plot of land is cleared and cultivated for a short period of time; then it is abandoned and allowed to revert to its natural vegetation while the cultivator moves on to another plot.

The period of cultivation is usually terminated when the. Swidden farming, also know as shifting cultivation or milpa in Latin America, is conventionally defined as “an agricultural system in which temporary clearings are cropped for fewer years than they are allowed to remain fallow” (Sanchez, ).

While certainly correct, this definition reflects a Western or modern emphasis on the relatively. In Central America, shifting cultivation is still widespread, and both Fig 6 and the survey results indicate an increase in some areas (e.g.

Panama, Guatemala) well into the s. In Mexico, however, the trend has been towards decreasing areas under shifting cultivation. A shift toward plant-based agriculture would create 19 million jobs in Latin America and the Caribbean byaccording to a new report. Compiled by Inter-American Development Bank and International Labour Organization, the “Jobs in a Net-Zero Emissions Future in Latin America and the Carribean” report discusses the necessity of decarbonizing the economy in an effort to mitigate the.

Transition Toward A Plant-Based Food System Would Create 19 Million Jobs In Latin America By 05 August by Agi Kaja Shifting toward plant-based food production would create 19 million jobs in Latin America and the Caribbean in the next decade, according to the newest report compiled by Inter-American Development Bank and International.

Book Description. Latin America occupies an increasingly prominent position within the global political, economic and cultural consciousness, with intra-regional governance structures and multilateral processes now a key topic of interest to foreign policy and international business circles.

Relatively little is known about the dynamics of N in shifting cultivation and related cropping systems in the humid tropics of Latin America. The soils that predominate in 82% of the region, namely Oxisols and Ultisols, have a fairly high total N content.

In this new global context and in the highly unstable political environment of post-war Latin American politics, the production and distribution of drugs became both more organized and more regional in scope as it continued to shift across Latin America. Most tragically, this period witnessed the massive expansion of drug-trade connected violence.

The knowledge behind the culture and beliefs of indigenous community needs to be harnessed and should be used to complement the modern technologies and policies for. emphasize the important role shifting cultivation continues to play for household food security.

As the authors of the Thai case study point out, ‘[i]n this ‘dual economy’, shifting cultivation and paddy fields are providing a safety net that allows engagement in more risky, cash-oriented production’ (p.

Subsistence farming continues today in large parts of rural Africa, and parts of Asia and Latin America. Inabout 2 billion people (slightly more than 25% of the world's population) in million households living in rural areas of developing nations survive as "smallholder" farmers, working less than 2 hectares (5 acres) of land.

Corruption and Corrosion in Latin America, A political scientist traces the history of corruption in Latin America, describes some of its more notorious recent examples, and analyzes the poisonous and corrosive effects of corruption on freedom and democracy in the region that are fostering an unstable regional and hemispheric security environment.

primarily the tropical regions of Latin America, sub-Saharan A Shifting cultivation predominates in the tropics or areas that 1) Farmers clear land for planting by slashing vegetation and. Latin American literature consists of the oral and written literature of Latin America in several languages, particularly in Spanish, Portuguese, and the indigenous languages of the Americas as well as literature of the United States written in the Spanish language.

It rose to particular prominence globally during the second half of the 20th century, largely due to the international success of. Shifting cultivation is an agricultural system in which plots of land are cultivated temporarily, then abandoned while post-disturbance fallow vegetation is allowed to freely grow while the cultivator moves on to another plot.

The period of cultivation is usually terminated when the soil shows signs of exhaustion or, more commonly, when the field is overrun by weeds.Terrace cultivation, method of growing crops on sides of hills or mountains by planting on graduated terraces built into the slope.

Though labor-intensive, the method has been employed effectively to maximize arable land area in variable terrains and to reduce soil erosion and water loss. Over the next four decades, hundreds of thousands of peoplein Guatemala alone were killed in guerrilla attacks, government crackdowns and civil wars across Latin America.